Our Guests Attending

Help us welcome and honor the following veterans and guests attending the Helicopters for Heroes’ Annual Helicopter Hunt and Festival. Thank you for your service.

We will be adding to this list as our attendees are confirmed.

Marine Corporal Garrett J. Carnes lost both legs after stepping on a pressure plate improvised explosive device (IED) while on a patrol with the 3rd Battalion 3rd Marines in Khan-Neshin, Helmand Province, Afghanistan on Feb. 19, 2012. Cpl Carnes underwent more than 30 surgeries from the time he was evacuated to Camp Dwyer to his time at Walter Reed. During his recovery, he made a goal to be walking on prosthetics by the time his fellow Marines returned home from their deployment. After only six weeks of physical therapy, Cpl Carnes greeted his returning comrades standing on the tarmac. He credits his wife Courtney with pushing him through his recovery.

Despite his determination and ability to overcome obstacles, Garrett still experiences everyday limitations. He and Courtney now have three sons, Chase, Easton, and Ronin. But fatherhood places new challenges on Garrett. He says ordinary tasks in his previous home, like feeding and changing his son were “like science projects.” Additionally, their former home had all carpeted floors, making it difficult for Garrett to get to his sons in the middle of the night in his wheelchair. The doors were not wide enough for him to get through while in his chair without his hands getting caught, and he could not reach everything in the kitchen without his wife’s assistance. “It’s belittling not being able to do what you want to do,” he says.

Garrett says his new specially adapted Homes For Our Troops home allows him to be the man of the house again and increases his confidence. Courtney says she lives her life more peacefully, being able to leave the house without worrying if Garrett will need her help. The Carnes chose to build their home close to their family in Burlington, N.C.

Currently in school pursuing a business degree, Garrett says a specially adapted home gives him comfort and stability at home and allows him to focus on his career.

Carnes is grateful to HFOT’s donors and supporters for making his specially adapted custom home a reality. “The best part about our home is there are no physical obstacles when it comes to raising my sons now. When simply wheeling out of my front door used to be a project, I now get to enjoy mornings out front watching my two children and listening to the birds while sitting next to my wife, and feel no frustration of scraped doorways or jammed fingers. The little things really go a long way toward feeling comfortable,” he says.

Attending with Homes for Our Troops

Marine Cpl

Garrett Carnes

Marine Corporal Garrett J. Carnes lost both legs after stepping on a pressure plate improvised explosive device (IED) while on a patrol with the 3rd Battalion 3rd Marines in Khan-Neshin, Helmand Province, Afghanistan on Feb. 19, 2012. Cpl Carnes underwent more than 30 surgeries from the time he was evacuated to Camp Dwyer to his time at Walter Reed. During his recovery, he made a goal to be walking on prosthetics by the time his fellow Marines returned home from their deployment. After only six weeks of physical therapy, Cpl Carnes greeted his returning comrades standing on the tarmac. He credits his wife Courtney with pushing him through his recovery.

Despite his determination and ability to overcome obstacles, Garrett still experiences everyday limitations. He and Courtney now have three sons, Chase, Easton, and Ronin. But fatherhood places new challenges on Garrett. He says ordinary tasks in his previous home, like feeding and changing his son were “like science projects.” Additionally, their former home had all carpeted floors, making it difficult for Garrett to get to his sons in the middle of the night in his wheelchair. The doors were not wide enough for him to get through while in his chair without his hands getting caught, and he could not reach everything in the kitchen without his wife’s assistance. “It’s belittling not being able to do what you want to do,” he says.

Garrett says his new specially adapted Homes For Our Troops home allows him to be the man of the house again and increases his confidence. Courtney says she lives her life more peacefully, being able to leave the house without worrying if Garrett will need her help. The Carnes chose to build their home close to their family in Burlington, N.C.

Currently in school pursuing a business degree, Garrett says a specially adapted home gives him comfort and stability at home and allows him to focus on his career.

Carnes is grateful to HFOT’s donors and supporters for making his specially adapted custom home a reality. “The best part about our home is there are no physical obstacles when it comes to raising my sons now. When simply wheeling out of my front door used to be a project, I now get to enjoy mornings out front watching my two children and listening to the birds while sitting next to my wife, and feel no frustration of scraped doorways or jammed fingers. The little things really go a long way toward feeling comfortable,” he says.

Attending with Homes for Our Troops

Marine Corporal Michael Fox was on his third deployment when he sustained the traumatic amputations of both of his legs in an improvised explosive device (IED) blast in Musa Qala, Afghanistan on Nov. 15, 2011.

The Fire Team Leader, also Echo Co. 2nd Battalion, 4th Marines, Cpl Fox and his men were looking for a suitable location to create a new patrol base. Upon entering a compound that looked like a good choice for the new base, Cpl Fox made his way to the top of a berm that appeared to have a good vantage point over the Wadi (dried creek-bed) and the surrounding hills. Turning to call to his designated marksman and alert him of the vantage point, Cpl Fox heard a blast as he was thrown into the air; dirt and darkness surrounding him. Hearing his squad calling to him, he realized that he could not move.

As the squad began administering lifesaving first aid, Michael learned that he had lost his legs. With four tourniquets in place, and a Landing Zone secured, a helicopter was able to transport him to Camp Bastion. Falling unconscious shortly after arriving at the local hospital, Cpl Fox was next transported to Landstuhl, Germany where he endured multiple surgeries while in the ICU to stabilize him for his eventual transport stateside.

Arriving at Walter Reed National Medical Center in Bethesda, M.d., Michael endured many more surgeries over the course of the next month. Eventually transferred to Balboa Naval Medical Center in San Diego for treatments and therapies, Michael remained there until his retirement.

Michael enjoys spending time with his wife Erica and hopes to return to college and study either automotive or photography. A racing enthusiast, he enjoys racing at the local drag strips. He also loves deep sea fishing. In November 2017, Michael and Erica became parents to a baby boy named Grant. Michael says his Homes For Our Troops home is going to give his son a head start in life. “Without any obstacles or barriers, I can get to him more quickly, which is safer for the both of us. The house does not limit me and I can be more effective as a parent. Our home is a blessing.”

Receiving a specially adapted home has been beneficial for Michael. He is now able to host holidays and family gatherings, and can heal in a safe environment. He would like to thank everyone who supported the building of his home. “The home allows me to be financially sound and I can pursue my hopes and dreams all with an improved daily quality of life,” he says.

Attending with Homes for Our Troops

Marine Cpl

Michael Fox

Marine Corporal Michael Fox was on his third deployment when he sustained the traumatic amputations of both of his legs in an improvised explosive device (IED) blast in Musa Qala, Afghanistan on Nov. 15, 2011.

The Fire Team Leader, also Echo Co. 2nd Battalion, 4th Marines, Cpl Fox and his men were looking for a suitable location to create a new patrol base. Upon entering a compound that looked like a good choice for the new base, Cpl Fox made his way to the top of a berm that appeared to have a good vantage point over the Wadi (dried creek-bed) and the surrounding hills. Turning to call to his designated marksman and alert him of the vantage point, Cpl Fox heard a blast as he was thrown into the air; dirt and darkness surrounding him. Hearing his squad calling to him, he realized that he could not move.

As the squad began administering lifesaving first aid, Michael learned that he had lost his legs. With four tourniquets in place, and a Landing Zone secured, a helicopter was able to transport him to Camp Bastion. Falling unconscious shortly after arriving at the local hospital, Cpl Fox was next transported to Landstuhl, Germany where he endured multiple surgeries while in the ICU to stabilize him for his eventual transport stateside.

Arriving at Walter Reed National Medical Center in Bethesda, M.d., Michael endured many more surgeries over the course of the next month. Eventually transferred to Balboa Naval Medical Center in San Diego for treatments and therapies, Michael remained there until his retirement.

Michael enjoys spending time with his wife Erica and hopes to return to college and study either automotive or photography. A racing enthusiast, he enjoys racing at the local drag strips. He also loves deep sea fishing. In November 2017, Michael and Erica became parents to a baby boy named Grant. Michael says his Homes For Our Troops home is going to give his son a head start in life. “Without any obstacles or barriers, I can get to him more quickly, which is safer for the both of us. The house does not limit me and I can be more effective as a parent. Our home is a blessing.”

Receiving a specially adapted home has been beneficial for Michael. He is now able to host holidays and family gatherings, and can heal in a safe environment. He would like to thank everyone who supported the building of his home. “The home allows me to be financially sound and I can pursue my hopes and dreams all with an improved daily quality of life,” he says.

Attending with Homes for Our Troops

Michael Gower was admittedly a “wild child” in his youth, and enlisted in the Army to find direction and discipline in his life. He deployed twice as an Infantryman out of Fort Lewis to Iraq during Operation Iraqi Freedom, 2003-2004 and 2006-2007.

On Aug. 2, 2007, while serving in Baghdad on his second deployment with A Company, 2nd Battalion, 3rd Infantry, 3rd Stryker Brigade, 2nd Infantry Division, the vehicle transporting Army SGT Gower rolled over a two-ton, subsurface improvised explosive device (IED). The subsequent blast killed several of SGT Gower’s teammates, and injured eight others, including fellow HFOT Veterans Adam Putt and Oscar Guerra. SGT Gower was pinned in the vehicle, critically injuring his back and fracturing both his feet, tibia and fibula. He also sustained a severe traumatic brain injury (TBI).

Medically retired in January 2009, Michael underwent numerous limb salvage surgeries over the years to aid in his recovery. Currently, he is only ambulatory for short distances, and doctors have not ruled out amputating both legs in the future. His specially adapted home from Homes For Our Troops provides him and his wife Kelli with a sense of security, enabling Michael to have full wheelchair access and independence. He previous home was on a hill with a steep driveway, which made it challenging for Michael to enter and exit is home. His HFOT home mitigates this issue. “This new home improves my quality of life because I am able to get in and out of my house,” says Michael. “It also makes my wife and son’s lives better since they don’t have to watch me struggle.”

In his free time, Michael enjoys spending time with Kelli and their son Alexander. He also enjoys hunting, fishing, woodworking and tinkering with small mechanical projects. Living in a mortgage-free home affords him the time to spend time on his hobbies, and equips him with the space he needs for his tools and projects. Most importantly, the home enables him to become financially stable and focus on being a dad.

Michael is already working to pay it forward by assisting several Veteran support organizations in his community. He is an active member in his VFW post, and is actively engaged with the Dorr American Legion, Operation Injured Soldiers, and Buddy to Buddy Program. He and Kelli are happy to be living in their home in Middleville close to family. They extend their gratitude to HFOT’s supporters for providing them with the life-changing gift of a new forever home and Michael is eager to pay it forward for HFOT.

Attending with Homes for Our Troops

Army SGT

MICHAEL GOWER

Michael Gower was admittedly a “wild child” in his youth, and enlisted in the Army to find direction and discipline in his life. He deployed twice as an Infantryman out of Fort Lewis to Iraq during Operation Iraqi Freedom, 2003-2004 and 2006-2007.

On Aug. 2, 2007, while serving in Baghdad on his second deployment with A Company, 2nd Battalion, 3rd Infantry, 3rd Stryker Brigade, 2nd Infantry Division, the vehicle transporting Army SGT Gower rolled over a two-ton, subsurface improvised explosive device (IED). The subsequent blast killed several of SGT Gower’s teammates, and injured eight others, including fellow HFOT Veterans Adam Putt and Oscar Guerra. SGT Gower was pinned in the vehicle, critically injuring his back and fracturing both his feet, tibia and fibula. He also sustained a severe traumatic brain injury (TBI).

Medically retired in January 2009, Michael underwent numerous limb salvage surgeries over the years to aid in his recovery. Currently, he is only ambulatory for short distances, and doctors have not ruled out amputating both legs in the future. His specially adapted home from Homes For Our Troops provides him and his wife Kelli with a sense of security, enabling Michael to have full wheelchair access and independence. He previous home was on a hill with a steep driveway, which made it challenging for Michael to enter and exit is home. His HFOT home mitigates this issue. “This new home improves my quality of life because I am able to get in and out of my house,” says Michael. “It also makes my wife and son’s lives better since they don’t have to watch me struggle.”

In his free time, Michael enjoys spending time with Kelli and their son Alexander. He also enjoys hunting, fishing, woodworking and tinkering with small mechanical projects. Living in a mortgage-free home affords him the time to spend time on his hobbies, and equips him with the space he needs for his tools and projects. Most importantly, the home enables him to become financially stable and focus on being a dad.

Michael is already working to pay it forward by assisting several Veteran support organizations in his community. He is an active member in his VFW post, and is actively engaged with the Dorr American Legion, Operation Injured Soldiers, and Buddy to Buddy Program. He and Kelli are happy to be living in their home in Middleville close to family. They extend their gratitude to HFOT’s supporters for providing them with the life-changing gift of a new forever home and Michael is eager to pay it forward for HFOT.

Attending with Homes for Our Troops

Oscar Guerra joined the Army in 1998 with a desire to travel and see the world. He immediately fell in love with the military. The climate and brotherhood of serving was like nothing he’d ever experienced.

On Aug. 2, 2007, Staff Sergeant Guerra was on his second deployment serving as an Infantryman with the 2nd Battalion, 3rd Infantry Regiment, 2nd Infantry Division, when his vehicle drove over an improvised explosive device (IED) near the Baghdad International Airport (BIAP). The subsequent blast killed several of SSG Guerra’s teammates and injured eight others, including fellow Homes For Our Troops Veterans Adam Putt and Michael Gower.

The explosion caused severe injuries to SSG Guerra’s left leg, and doctors immediately amputated it at a Baghdad hospital after his medical evacuation. Once he returned to the United States, he continued surgeries and rehabilitation at Brooke Army Medical Center in San Antonio. At first, Oscar had a difficult time during his recovery. However, he soon found inspiration from others he rehabbed with, and his outlook improved with each new milestone he reached.

Now medically retired, Oscar’s main priority is his three sons and wife Felicia. He says it is especially important to him to raise his sons as good, productive men. He enjoys inspiring and influencing young people and hopes to become involved in community based activities as a mentor, like the Boy Scouts of America and Junior ROTC.

Oscar wants to continue giving back to others, but his current living environment prevents him from pursuing many of his aspirations. It is frustrating for Oscar that Felicia takes on much of the outdoor home maintenance because their home is on a hill and difficult for Oscar to navigate on his prosthetics. His bathroom is not wheelchair accessible, so Oscar is forced to hop on his remaining limb when transferring into the shower, risking further injury. It is especially discouraging for him to rely on his family for help around the home because his wheelchair does not fit in many of the rooms and hallways. He says receiving a specially adapted custom HFOT home will mitigate many of his current obstacles and empower him to pursue his future endeavors. He would like to continue his education and start his own nonprofit. “Giving back will be my new mission,” he says.

Originally from Los Angeles, Oscar is choosing to build his home in Texas for the area’s climate and culture.

Oscar wants HFOT donors to know his home will not only benefit himself, but his family as a whole. “The home is going to restart our life and keep us worry-free, and create the environment we can only dream about now,” he says.

Attending with Homes for Our Troops

Army SSG

OSCAR GUERRA

Oscar Guerra joined the Army in 1998 with a desire to travel and see the world. He immediately fell in love with the military. The climate and brotherhood of serving was like nothing he’d ever experienced.

On Aug. 2, 2007, Staff Sergeant Guerra was on his second deployment serving as an Infantryman with the 2nd Battalion, 3rd Infantry Regiment, 2nd Infantry Division, when his vehicle drove over an improvised explosive device (IED) near the Baghdad International Airport (BIAP). The subsequent blast killed several of SSG Guerra’s teammates and injured eight others, including fellow Homes For Our Troops Veterans Adam Putt and Michael Gower.

The explosion caused severe injuries to SSG Guerra’s left leg, and doctors immediately amputated it at a Baghdad hospital after his medical evacuation. Once he returned to the United States, he continued surgeries and rehabilitation at Brooke Army Medical Center in San Antonio. At first, Oscar had a difficult time during his recovery. However, he soon found inspiration from others he rehabbed with, and his outlook improved with each new milestone he reached.

Now medically retired, Oscar’s main priority is his three sons and wife Felicia. He says it is especially important to him to raise his sons as good, productive men. He enjoys inspiring and influencing young people and hopes to become involved in community based activities as a mentor, like the Boy Scouts of America and Junior ROTC.

Oscar wants to continue giving back to others, but his current living environment prevents him from pursuing many of his aspirations. It is frustrating for Oscar that Felicia takes on much of the outdoor home maintenance because their home is on a hill and difficult for Oscar to navigate on his prosthetics. His bathroom is not wheelchair accessible, so Oscar is forced to hop on his remaining limb when transferring into the shower, risking further injury. It is especially discouraging for him to rely on his family for help around the home because his wheelchair does not fit in many of the rooms and hallways. He says receiving a specially adapted custom HFOT home will mitigate many of his current obstacles and empower him to pursue his future endeavors. He would like to continue his education and start his own nonprofit. “Giving back will be my new mission,” he says.

Originally from Los Angeles, Oscar is choosing to build his home in Texas for the area’s climate and culture.

Oscar wants HFOT donors to know his home will not only benefit himself, but his family as a whole. “The home is going to restart our life and keep us worry-free, and create the environment we can only dream about now,” he says.

Attending with Homes for Our Troops

After the September 11 attacks, Quentin Hamilton felt called to serve and defend the country he loves. He enlisted in the Marines following his high school graduation as a mortarman with the 2nd Battalion, 4th Marines, and loved the brotherhood and pride he felt being a Marine. He went on his first tour in 2007 to Iraq, and deployed twice to Afghanistan in 2010 and 2011. He also went on two humanitarian deployments with the 11th Marine Expeditionary Unit (MEU) to Okinawa in 2008 and Burma in 2009.

On Jan. 31, 2012, during his third combat deployment, Sgt Hamilton sustained severe damage to his left leg and other injuries when he stepped on an improvised explosive device (IED) in the NowZad District in Afghanistan. After years of dealing with intense pain, Quentin made the difficult decision to have doctors amputate his left leg.

Now medically retired, Quentin and his fiancée, Stefanie Clemons, are busy raising their young daughter, Abigail, and son, Gunner. A lover of the outdoors, Quentin enjoys hiking, biking, and swimming, but his current living environment prevents him from enjoying these activities since he cannot rest and recover comfortably at home. He often gets frustrated that he cannot use his wheelchair because the doorways are too narrow and using crutches often becomes painful. “This home will enable me to be more adventurous like I once was, knowing I have a safe and secure home to go back to where I will be able to relax and recoup at night,” he says.

The freedom and independence Quentin will regain in the new home will motivate him to further his education and career. He and Stefanie would like to open their own RV storage business, and expand their hobby of making American flags out of reclaimed wood. Most importantly, Quentin will be able to help Stefanie more in caring for their children and around the home.

Originally from Iowa, Quentin is choosing to build his home in Texas.

Quentin and Stefanie say their HFOT home is a dream come true and they appreciate the generosity of HFOT’s donors and supporters. “Your support is doing amazing things for my fellow wounded countrymen. You are opening up these Veterans’ lives and getting them back out and doing what they love,” says Quentin.

Attending with Homes for Our Troops

Marine Sgt

QUENTIN HAMILTON

After the September 11 attacks, Quentin Hamilton felt called to serve and defend the country he loves. He enlisted in the Marines following his high school graduation as a mortarman with the 2nd Battalion, 4th Marines, and loved the brotherhood and pride he felt being a Marine. He went on his first tour in 2007 to Iraq, and deployed twice to Afghanistan in 2010 and 2011. He also went on two humanitarian deployments with the 11th Marine Expeditionary Unit (MEU) to Okinawa in 2008 and Burma in 2009.

On Jan. 31, 2012, during his third combat deployment, Sgt Hamilton sustained severe damage to his left leg and other injuries when he stepped on an improvised explosive device (IED) in the NowZad District in Afghanistan. After years of dealing with intense pain, Quentin made the difficult decision to have doctors amputate his left leg.

Now medically retired, Quentin and his fiancée, Stefanie Clemons, are busy raising their young daughter, Abigail, and son, Gunner. A lover of the outdoors, Quentin enjoys hiking, biking, and swimming, but his current living environment prevents him from enjoying these activities since he cannot rest and recover comfortably at home. He often gets frustrated that he cannot use his wheelchair because the doorways are too narrow and using crutches often becomes painful. “This home will enable me to be more adventurous like I once was, knowing I have a safe and secure home to go back to where I will be able to relax and recoup at night,” he says.

The freedom and independence Quentin will regain in the new home will motivate him to further his education and career. He and Stefanie would like to open their own RV storage business, and expand their hobby of making American flags out of reclaimed wood. Most importantly, Quentin will be able to help Stefanie more in caring for their children and around the home.

Originally from Iowa, Quentin is choosing to build his home in Texas.

Quentin and Stefanie say their HFOT home is a dream come true and they appreciate the generosity of HFOT’s donors and supporters. “Your support is doing amazing things for my fellow wounded countrymen. You are opening up these Veterans’ lives and getting them back out and doing what they love,” says Quentin.

Attending with Homes for Our Troops

Attending with Homes for Our Troops

ARMY CPL

DUANE MCGYGHY

Attending with Homes for Our Troops

In 2007, Army Specialist Adam Putt deployed as a rifleman with the 2nd Battalion, 3rd Infantry, 3rd Stryker Brigade, 2nd Infantry Division to Baghdad, Iraq. On Aug. 2, 2007, one month into his deployment, he was in an improvised explosive device (IED) explosion. The blast killed several of SPC Putt’s squad members, and severely injured him and others, including fellow HFOT Veterans Michael Gower and Oscar Guerra. SPC Putt lost both legs as a result of the blast.

Now medically retired, Adam enjoys painting, reading, and practicing Brazilian Jiu Jitsu with his son. He is also involved with Honoring America’s Warriors, an organization that provides military honors at funerals and helps Veterans adjust to civilian life.

Adam usually wears his prosthetics throughout the day, but when at home he prefers his wheelchair. He says having a wheelchair-accessible home from Homes For Our Troops is a blessing. He especially enjoys having an adapted bathroom and kitchen. His wheelchair could not fit in several rooms in his previous home, which made it difficult to do daily, routine activities such as showering or preparing a meal.

Adam’s greatest concern in his previous home was being able to provide for his wife Tiffany and their two sons. Because of his injuries, Adam felt like he was not able to fulfill this role. He says receiving a home adapted to his injuries mitigates this worry and enables him to focus on finishing his degree in biology.

Originally from Oklahoma, Adam and Tiffany chose to remain in the state and had their home built outside Oklahoma City for the area’s excellent school district.

Adam is grateful to HFOT’s supporters and donors who contributed to his build and says the home is a way for him to move forward. “Injured Veterans lose their mission and goals, not just limbs. In this home I have regained my freedom and independence, allowing me to carry on another mission,” he says.

Attending with Home for Our Troops

Army SPC

ADAM PUTT

In 2007, Army Specialist Adam Putt deployed as a rifleman with the 2nd Battalion, 3rd Infantry, 3rd Stryker Brigade, 2nd Infantry Division to Baghdad, Iraq. On Aug. 2, 2007, one month into his deployment, he was in an improvised explosive device (IED) explosion. The blast killed several of SPC Putt’s squad members, and severely injured him and others, including fellow HFOT Veterans Michael Gower and Oscar Guerra. SPC Putt lost both legs as a result of the blast.

Now medically retired, Adam enjoys painting, reading, and practicing Brazilian Jiu Jitsu with his son. He is also involved with Honoring America’s Warriors, an organization that provides military honors at funerals and helps Veterans adjust to civilian life.

Adam usually wears his prosthetics throughout the day, but when at home he prefers his wheelchair. He says having a wheelchair-accessible home from Homes For Our Troops is a blessing. He especially enjoys having an adapted bathroom and kitchen. His wheelchair could not fit in several rooms in his previous home, which made it difficult to do daily, routine activities such as showering or preparing a meal.

Adam’s greatest concern in his previous home was being able to provide for his wife Tiffany and their two sons. Because of his injuries, Adam felt like he was not able to fulfill this role. He says receiving a home adapted to his injuries mitigates this worry and enables him to focus on finishing his degree in biology.

Originally from Oklahoma, Adam and Tiffany chose to remain in the state and had their home built outside Oklahoma City for the area’s excellent school district.

Adam is grateful to HFOT’s supporters and donors who contributed to his build and says the home is a way for him to move forward. “Injured Veterans lose their mission and goals, not just limbs. In this home I have regained my freedom and independence, allowing me to carry on another mission,” he says.

Attending with Home for Our Troops

Vincent Reynolds grew up playing Army, so joining the military felt like a natural decision. He enlisted as an indirect fire infantryman with the 1st Battalion, 23rd Infantry, 2nd Infantry Division after high school.

On Sept. 3, 2012, Staff Sergeant Reynolds was on his second deployment when he stepped on an improvised explosive device (IED) in Kandahar Province, Afghanistan. SSG Reynolds’ first thought during the explosion was checking to ensure his Soldiers were alright, not even realizing he was injured himself. The blast resulted in the loss of his left leg and damage to his right leg.

Now medically retired, Vincent enjoys hunting, fishing, golfing, camping, and spending time with his two daughters and wife Denise. Vincent says his specially adapted custom Homes For Our Troops home helps him be a better father. His previous home was two stories, which made it difficult for him to carry his youngest daughter up and down the stairs. In his single-level HFOT home with an open floorplan and wide doorways and hallways, Vincent is able to care for his daughter easily. “I could write a book about how this home changed not only my life physically, but how it makes me feel a lot less stressed,” he says.

With the daily challenges of navigating a non-adaptive home lifted, Vincent now has more energy to put into his current pursuits. He works cattle and horses at the HFOT home and, when all the chores are taken care of, he guides remote hunting trips, and is a co-host on Pursuit Channel’s Old School Outdoors hunting show.

Originally from Pennsylvania, Vincent chose to build his home in Texas for the warm climate and to be close to Denise’s family.

Vincent is thankful to HFOT’s donors and supporters who made the dream of living in an adapted home possible. “It is humbling to know there are people out there who care,” he says.

Attending with Homes for Our Troops

ARMY SSG

VINCENT REYNOLDS

Vincent Reynolds grew up playing Army, so joining the military felt like a natural decision. He enlisted as an indirect fire infantryman with the 1st Battalion, 23rd Infantry, 2nd Infantry Division after high school.

On Sept. 3, 2012, Staff Sergeant Reynolds was on his second deployment when he stepped on an improvised explosive device (IED) in Kandahar Province, Afghanistan. SSG Reynolds’ first thought during the explosion was checking to ensure his Soldiers were alright, not even realizing he was injured himself. The blast resulted in the loss of his left leg and damage to his right leg.

Now medically retired, Vincent enjoys hunting, fishing, golfing, camping, and spending time with his two daughters and wife Denise. Vincent says his specially adapted custom Homes For Our Troops home helps him be a better father. His previous home was two stories, which made it difficult for him to carry his youngest daughter up and down the stairs. In his single-level HFOT home with an open floorplan and wide doorways and hallways, Vincent is able to care for his daughter easily. “I could write a book about how this home changed not only my life physically, but how it makes me feel a lot less stressed,” he says.

With the daily challenges of navigating a non-adaptive home lifted, Vincent now has more energy to put into his current pursuits. He works cattle and horses at the HFOT home and, when all the chores are taken care of, he guides remote hunting trips, and is a co-host on Pursuit Channel’s Old School Outdoors hunting show.

Originally from Pennsylvania, Vincent chose to build his home in Texas for the warm climate and to be close to Denise’s family.

Vincent is thankful to HFOT’s donors and supporters who made the dream of living in an adapted home possible. “It is humbling to know there are people out there who care,” he says.

Attending with Homes for Our Troops

Chad Rozanski joined the Army not long after graduating from high school, wanting to give back and seeking change. He enlisted as a fire support specialist with the 2nd Brigade Combat Team, 1st Armored Division. Chad loved the brotherhood and camaraderie he developed while serving with his brothers in arms.

In 2005, Sergeant Rozanski went on his first tour to Iraq with the 1st Battalion, 35th Armor Regiment. During that deployment, on July, 2, 2006, Sergeant Rozanski’s vehicle ran over an improvised explosive device (IED) in Ramadi, Iraq. The blast caused the vehicle to rollover, pinning SGT Rozanski underneath the burning wreckage. It took SGT Rozanski’s team members almost an hour to free him from the vehicle by digging with shovels and using a jack.

Once transferred back to the United States, Chad began what he describes as a long and painful recovery at Brooke Army Medical Center. He underwent countless surgeries, with doctors amputating both of his legs above the knee. He also sustained burns to almost 40 percent of his body, which required skin grafts. Despite all he’s been through, Chad still considers himself a lucky man.

Now medically retired, Chad’s two children are his whole world. He enjoys supporting his son Logan’s baseball team, and loves watching the players learn the game and work together. He wishes he could do more for his children and spend more time with them, but his current living environment makes it difficult. Since Chad’s home is not wheelchair accessible, keeping up with his toddler daughter, Lydia, gets exhausting. When he is active and busy, he tends to push his physical limits, requiring him to spend days recovering. Because of this, Chad will often turn down social opportunities. He says receiving a specially adapted custom Homes For Our Troops home will change his mindset. “Being in a home where I won’t have daily limitations, I will almost be able to forget how injured I am. There has always been something that is out of reach or impossible for me to do in every home I have lived in after my injury.”

The financial freedom of a donated home will give Chad the foundation to pursue school and a career. He plans to go to school for gunsmithing or sustainable agriculture.

Originally from Arkansas, Chad is choosing to build his home in Florida.

Attending with Homes for Our Troops

ARMY SGT

CHAD ROZANSKI

Chad Rozanski joined the Army not long after graduating from high school, wanting to give back and seeking change. He enlisted as a fire support specialist with the 2nd Brigade Combat Team, 1st Armored Division. Chad loved the brotherhood and camaraderie he developed while serving with his brothers in arms.

In 2005, Sergeant Rozanski went on his first tour to Iraq with the 1st Battalion, 35th Armor Regiment. During that deployment, on July, 2, 2006, Sergeant Rozanski’s vehicle ran over an improvised explosive device (IED) in Ramadi, Iraq. The blast caused the vehicle to rollover, pinning SGT Rozanski underneath the burning wreckage. It took SGT Rozanski’s team members almost an hour to free him from the vehicle by digging with shovels and using a jack.

Once transferred back to the United States, Chad began what he describes as a long and painful recovery at Brooke Army Medical Center. He underwent countless surgeries, with doctors amputating both of his legs above the knee. He also sustained burns to almost 40 percent of his body, which required skin grafts. Despite all he’s been through, Chad still considers himself a lucky man.

Now medically retired, Chad’s two children are his whole world. He enjoys supporting his son Logan’s baseball team, and loves watching the players learn the game and work together. He wishes he could do more for his children and spend more time with them, but his current living environment makes it difficult. Since Chad’s home is not wheelchair accessible, keeping up with his toddler daughter, Lydia, gets exhausting. When he is active and busy, he tends to push his physical limits, requiring him to spend days recovering. Because of this, Chad will often turn down social opportunities. He says receiving a specially adapted custom Homes For Our Troops home will change his mindset. “Being in a home where I won’t have daily limitations, I will almost be able to forget how injured I am. There has always been something that is out of reach or impossible for me to do in every home I have lived in after my injury.”

The financial freedom of a donated home will give Chad the foundation to pursue school and a career. He plans to go to school for gunsmithing or sustainable agriculture.

Originally from Arkansas, Chad is choosing to build his home in Florida.

Attending with Homes for Our Troops

In 2003, Army Sergeant Patrick Wickens deployed to Iraq, assigned as a wheel vehicle mechanic with the 4-27 Field Artillery, 2nd Brigade, 1st Armored Division. On May 14, 2004, he was struck by a rocket-propelled grenade (RPG) during an ambush near Mahmudiyah, Iraq. He immediately lost his right leg above the knee and sustained shrapnel wounds and burns on his left leg. His medic and teammates are credited with applying tourniquets and rendering life-saving medical assistance, as both femoral arteries were severed in the blast.

After arriving in the United States a few days later, SGT Wickens endured weeks of surgeries and skin grafts at Walter Reed Medical Center. After repeated infections, doctors performed surgery to amputate his right leg at the hip.

Medically retired in January 2006, Patrick loves spending time with his wife Jenna and their two sons Gavin and Carter. He leads an active lifestyle by playing golf, kayaking, fishing, scuba diving, cycling, exercising, and traveling. In his spare time, Patrick volunteers with the nonprofit, The Mission Continues, building playgrounds and fixing bicycles in his community. He is also active with Fairways for Warriors, a nonprofit that provides golf equipment, instruction, and outings for injured Veterans and their families.

Although Patrick excels at activities on the green and in the water, he faced challenges within his previous home. His wheelchair did not fit in several rooms. This environment required Patrick to hop in and out of the shower and stand on his leg while doing laundry.

A specially adapted custom Homes For Our Troops home with an accessible bathroom and wide doorways mitigates Patrick’s challenges around the home. The home also gives Jenna independence, as she does not have to worry about his safety when he is home alone. “This home is the biggest blessing my family has ever received,” Patrick says.

A safe living situation gives Patrick more time to focus on his future plans, which include going back to school. Originally from Montana, Patrick chose to build his home in Orlando, Fla., for the warm weather and to be close to family.

Patrick says he cannot thank HFOT’s donors, volunteers and supporters enough for making his home a reality. “My entire family benefits from this amazing, once in a lifetime opportunity,” he says. “This HFOT home represents freedom from banks and a mortgage, so we can do some of the things we have wanted to do as family.”

Attending with Homes for Our Troops

ARMY SGT

PATRICK WICKENS

In 2003, Army Sergeant Patrick Wickens deployed to Iraq, assigned as a wheel vehicle mechanic with the 4-27 Field Artillery, 2nd Brigade, 1st Armored Division. On May 14, 2004, he was struck by a rocket-propelled grenade (RPG) during an ambush near Mahmudiyah, Iraq. He immediately lost his right leg above the knee and sustained shrapnel wounds and burns on his left leg. His medic and teammates are credited with applying tourniquets and rendering life-saving medical assistance, as both femoral arteries were severed in the blast.

After arriving in the United States a few days later, SGT Wickens endured weeks of surgeries and skin grafts at Walter Reed Medical Center. After repeated infections, doctors performed surgery to amputate his right leg at the hip.

Medically retired in January 2006, Patrick loves spending time with his wife Jenna and their two sons Gavin and Carter. He leads an active lifestyle by playing golf, kayaking, fishing, scuba diving, cycling, exercising, and traveling. In his spare time, Patrick volunteers with the nonprofit, The Mission Continues, building playgrounds and fixing bicycles in his community. He is also active with Fairways for Warriors, a nonprofit that provides golf equipment, instruction, and outings for injured Veterans and their families.

Although Patrick excels at activities on the green and in the water, he faced challenges within his previous home. His wheelchair did not fit in several rooms. This environment required Patrick to hop in and out of the shower and stand on his leg while doing laundry.

A specially adapted custom Homes For Our Troops home with an accessible bathroom and wide doorways mitigates Patrick’s challenges around the home. The home also gives Jenna independence, as she does not have to worry about his safety when he is home alone. “This home is the biggest blessing my family has ever received,” Patrick says.

A safe living situation gives Patrick more time to focus on his future plans, which include going back to school. Originally from Montana, Patrick chose to build his home in Orlando, Fla., for the warm weather and to be close to family.

Patrick says he cannot thank HFOT’s donors, volunteers and supporters enough for making his home a reality. “My entire family benefits from this amazing, once in a lifetime opportunity,” he says. “This HFOT home represents freedom from banks and a mortgage, so we can do some of the things we have wanted to do as family.”

Attending with Homes for Our Troops

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